New treatment could benefit up to 45 per cent of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy – University of Alberta

Toshifumi Yokota led research to develop and test a new “cocktail” drug that may be beneficial for up to 45 per cent of patients with a common form of muscular dystrophy — a significantly higher proportion than currently available treatments. (Photo: Supplied)

 
Up to 45 per cent of patients with the most common inherited neuromuscular disease could benefit from a new “cocktail” drug being developed at the University of Alberta, according to research published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The drug could provide an effective and economical treatment to lessen symptoms for the six of every 100,000 people — usually boys — affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a chronic muscle-wasting disease, according to lead researcher Toshifumi Yokota, professor of medical genetics in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry.

Read more at: https://www.ualberta.ca/folio/2022/02/new-treatment-could-benefit-up-to-45-per-cent-of-patients-with-duchenne-muscular-dystrophy.html