Injectable porous scaffolds promote better, quicker healing after spinal cord injuries – EurekAlert

Images show myelinated axons in biomaterial scaffolds eight weeks after injection into the injured cord of a mouse. Scaffolds were fabricated from hyaluronic acid (HA) with a regular network of cell-scale macropores and loaded with gene therapy vectors encoding for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), to promote axonal survival and regeneration. These were compared to control scaffolds, which were lacking the BDNF vector. Images show dense infiltration of cells (shown in blue, cell nuclei), axons (shown in red in A, NF200 protein) and myelinating glial cells (shown in green, myelin basic protein) in the BDNF-laden scaffolds. Scale bars = 200 μm.
CREDIT: Seidlits et al.

 
Spinal cord injuries can be life-changing and alter many important neurological functions. Unfortunately, clinicians have relatively few tools to help patients regain lost functions.

In APL Bioengineering, by AIP Publishing, researchers from UCLA have developed materials that can interface with an injured spinal cord and provide a scaffolding to facilitate healing. To do this, scaffolding materials need to mimic the natural spinal cord tissue, so they can be readily populated by native cells in the spinal cord, essentially filling in gaps left by injury.

“In this study, we demonstrate that incorporating a regular network of pores throughout these materials, where pores are sized similarly to normal cells, increases infiltration of cells from spinal cord tissue into the material implant and improves regeneration of nerves throughout the injured area,” said author Stephanie Seidlits.

Click here to read full article https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-03/aiop-ips030821.php

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