Let's focus on what we can do!

By Disabled People for Disabled People

Let's focus on what we can do, not what we can't!

Online Platform By Disabled People for Disabled People

Let's focus on what we can do, not what we can't!

Online Platform By Disabled People for Disabled People

  • Home
  • >
  • Latest Headlines
  • >
  • Early decompression promotes motor recovery after cervical spinal cord injury in rats with chronic cervical spinal cord compression – Nature

Early decompression promotes motor recovery after cervical spinal cord injury in rats with chronic cervical spinal cord compression – Nature

Thursday, 25 August, 2022

Early decompression promotes motor recovery after cervical spinal cord injury in rats with chronic cervical spinal cord compression – Nature

A CT taken just after the sheet insertion surgery. A C6 laminectomy was performed and a sheet was inserted on the dorsal spinal cord at the C4–C5 level.

 

Abstract

The number of elderly patients with spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormalities (SCIWORA) has been increasing in recent years and common of most cervical spinal cord injuries. Basic research has shown the effectiveness of early decompression after spinal cord injury on the spinal cord without stenosis; no studies have reported the efficacy of decompression in models with spinal cord compressive lesions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of decompression surgery after acute spinal cord injury in rats with chronic spinal cord compressive lesions, mimicking SCIWORA. A water-absorbent polymer sheet (Aquaprene DX, Sanyo Chemical Industries) was inserted dorsally into the 4–5th cervical sublaminar space in 8-week-old Sprague Dawley rats to create a rat model with a chronic spinal compressive lesion. At the age of 16 weeks, 30 mildly myelopathic or asymptomatic rats with a Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score (BBB score) of 19 or higher were subjected to spinal cord compression injuries. The rats were divided into three groups: an immediate decompression group (decompress immediately after injury), a sub-acute decompression group (decompress 1 week after injury), and a non-decompression group. Behavioral and histological evaluations were performed 4 weeks after the injury. At 20 weeks of age, the BBB score and FLS (Forelimb Locomotor Scale) of both the immediate and the sub-acute decompression groups were significantly higher than those of the non-decompression group. There was no significant difference between the immediate decompression group and the sub-acute decompression group. TUNEL (transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) staining showed significantly fewer positive cells in both decompression groups compared to the non-decompression group. LFB (Luxol fast blue) staining showed significantly more demyelination, and GAP-43 (growth associated protein-43) staining tended to show fewer positive cells in the non-decompression group. Decompression surgery in the acute or sub-acute phase of injury is effective after mild spinal cord injury in rats with chronic compressive lesions. There was no significant difference between the immediate decompression and sub-acute decompression groups.

Read more at: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-022-14723-8

Categories :
  • Latest Headlines
  • Spinal Cord Injury
Socials :

Recent posts