Busting myths of autism – The Northern Echo

MOST people have heard of autism. In the UK alone, there are 700,000 people diagnosed with the condition – and many more undiagnosed.

But do they really know what it is, where it comes from and how it affects our relatives, friends, work colleagues and neighbours?

Here are some common myths about the condition – and the reality.

Myth

Autistic people are really good with maths and numbers.

Reality

Autism is an incredible diverse condition, and each autistic person is as individual as the next. While some may be great with numbers, others may find maths difficult, or even have dyscalculia (a disorder of number similar to dyslexia).

Myth

People with autism struggle in social situations.

Reality

Just like everyone else, those with autism want to have friends and be accepted in all social situations. Just because some may slightly struggle with interactions and some forms of communications does not mean they are aloof or uninterested.

Myth

Autism is a mental health condition

Reality

This is not the case. It is a neurological condition which means the brain processes information slightly differently. People with autism can, just like everyone else, suffer from mental health conditions.

Myth

The ‘Rain Man’ myth – all children with autism have some kind of special super-human ability.

Reality

It’s not quite so black and white. Most people with autism do not have ‘amazing gifts’ just as many gifted people do not have autism. A minority may have some special abilities – the proportion varies on who you ask – but those you see on TV or read about in the newspapers should not be a guide to everyone with autism.

Read more at: http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/news/16128181.Busting_myths_of_autism/

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