Breakthrough for genetic hearing loss as gene editing prevents deafness in mice – The Guardian

Deafness has been prevented in mice using gene editing for the first time, in an advance that could transform future treatment of genetic hearing loss.

The study found that a single injection of a gene editing cocktail prevented progressive deafness in baby animals that were destined to lose their hearing.

“We hope that the work will one day inform the development of a cure for certain forms of genetic deafness in people,” said Prof David Liu, who led the work at Harvard University and MIT.

Nearly half of all cases of deafness have a genetic root, but current treatment options are limited. However, the advent of new high-precision gene editing tools such as Crispr has raised the prospect of a new class of therapies that target the underlying problem.

The study, published in the journal Nature, focused on a mutation in a gene called Tmc1, a single wrong letter in the genetic code, that causes the loss of the inner ear’s hair cells over time.

The delicate hairs, which sit in a spiral-shaped organ called the cochlea, vibrate in response to sound waves. Nerve cells pick up the physical motion and transmit it to the brain, where it is perceived as sound.

If a child inherits one copy of the mutated Tmc1 gene they will suffer progressive hearing loss, normally starting in the first decade of life and resulting in profound deafness within 10 to 15 years. However, since most people affected by the mutation will also have a healthy version of the gene, inherited from their other parent, the scientists wanted to explore whether deleting the faulty version worked as a treatment.

Read more at: https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/dec/20/breakthrough-for-genetic-hearing-loss-as-gene-editing-prevents-deafness-in-mice

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