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  • Anne Hailes: Preconceptions about deafness are outrageous – the Irish News

Anne Hailes: Preconceptions about deafness are outrageous – the Irish News

Wednesday, 7 June, 2017

Anne Hailes: Preconceptions about deafness are outrageous – the Irish News

I COULDN’T believe the misconceptions the public have about deafness. Here are a few as told to the National Deaf Children’s Society by their members.

“When I was 10 a shop worker asked if the man I was interpreting for was my uncle or a friend. When I said it was my dad she asked how was it possible he had a child if he was deaf.”

“I’ve been told by people that I shouldn’t have children because it would be irresponsible and selfish to inflict deafness on someone else.”

“I contacted a school to enquire whether it might be suitable for my deaf son and was informed that, as all the pupils were very bright, it would not be appropriate.”

“I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve been asked by parents of small deaf children if I’ve ever had a boyfriend or if it’s possible to ‘find love’ and be in a relationship as a deaf person. So it’s quite a common misconception that deaf people aren’t loveable.”

“When I passed my driving theory test, at the test centre the receptionist looked really surprised when she handed me my results. She said: “You passed! You got 34 out of 35. Can you actually read?” I replied sarcastically, “No, I chose all the answers at random and somehow managed to get 34 right out of 35. Of course I can read!”

“I was in McDonalds with my cochlear impact on show, when the cashier handed me a menu in Braille. When I explained I’m deaf and not blind, he insisted this would help anyway.”

“The amount of times I have had ‘but you don’t look deaf’. How exactly am I supposed to look?”

“Every time I go into a mobile phone shop, the first thing I say is that I’m deaf. In the course of the conversation, I’m told that I’ll need to ring the call centre. I always say that I’ve come into the store because I cannot ring the call centre, I’m deaf, but they always insist that I need to ring the call centre anyway.”


Source: Anne Hailes: Preconceptions about deafness are outrageous - the Irish News

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